Bullfrog Films
50 minutes
Grades 10-12

Directed by Michel Khleifi
Produced by Sindibad Films

DVD Purchase $150, Rent $75
VHS Purchase $150, Rent $75

US Release Date: 1994
Copyright Date: 1994
DVD ISBN: 1-59458-621-7
VHS ISBN: 1-56029-590-2

Subjects
Conflict Resolution
Developing World
Humanities
Immigration
Israel
Middle East
Migration
Palestine
Population
Refugees
Social Psychology
War
War and Peace

Awards and Festivals
Basia des Cultures Mediterraneennes
Developing Stories - Series 2 Series
The Tale of the Three Lost Jewels

A tale of love and hope in the Gaza Strip.

"The daily life and stability of Palestinians is beautifully portrayed." MultiCultural Review

Shot in the final, turbulent days of the Israeli occupation of the Gaza Strip, Michel Khleifi's film tells the tale of a magical love story between two adolescents in a time of war and danger.

Yusef, a 12-year-old refugee growing up in the Intifada, lives with his mother and 15-year-old sister. His brother is a fugitive; his father has been in prison for the last nine years. But Yusef has a world of his own. He loves birds and drifts into the wilderness at every opportunity. One day he runs into Aida, a beautiful, wild girl his own age. He becomes completely infatuated with her, and tells her he wants to marry her when they grow up. But she replies that only the suitor who finds the three jewels, lost in Latin America, from her grandmother's necklace can win her hand. And so begin his attempts to reach Latin America...

Other titles in the series are:

Désounen-Dialogue with Death - Impressionistic look reveals the reality of daily life in Haiti.

The Legacy of Malthus - Argues that overpopulation is not the real cause of poverty.

The Tree of Our Forefathers - A refugee family makes the long journey home from exile to Mozambique.

Web Page: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/tale.html

Reviews
"The daily life and stability of Palestinians is beautifully portrayed. Despite the violence of everyday life, there is a recognition that hope and love can transcend."

MultiCultural Review