Bullfrog Films
26 minutes
Closed Captioned

Grades 7-12, College, Adult

Directed by Patricio Henriquez
Produced by Robbie Hart and Luc Côté, Adobe Productions

DVD Purchase $59, Rent $35
VHS Purchase $59, Rent $35

US Release Date: 1998
Copyright Date: 1997
DVD ISBN: 1-59458-362-5
VHS ISBN: 1-56029-742-5

Subjects
Developing World
Humanities
Performing Arts
Political Science
Poverty
Social Psychology
Social Science
Sociology
Theater

Awards and Festivals
Silver Apple, National Educational Media Network Competition
Honorable Mention, Columbus International Film Festival
Rainmakers Series
Ramiro Garcia in Peru
Villa El Salvador, Peru - Urban Poverty

Social change is possible through the arts and humor.

"Demonstrates to teenage viewers that individuals can make a difference." MultiCultural Review

"Rainmakers" is a series that tells the inspiring story of six youth leaders from around the world who have overcome difficult personal situations to take control of their lives and help others.

Ramiro Garcia grew up around alcoholism, family violence and political oppression. Believing that social change is possible through the arts and humor, he runs his own theater troupe staging plays for children.

The other titles in the series are:

Rena McLeod in Canada - An aboriginal mother fights for native justice.

Razvan Marcu in Romania - After Ceausescu, Razvan Marcu now fights for a clean environment.

Victor "Gotti" Cherry in New York - A former gang leader now works with troubled youth.

Shakuntala Kazmi in India - A low-caste Hindu, Shakuntala Kazmi fights for women's rights.

Jongsada Suwanchondee in Thailand - HIV-positive, a former heroin addict helps others understand AIDS.

Web Page: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/rain3.html

Reviews
"All six videos feature well-selected historical footage, lively action, and, above all, engaging heroes who have much to show to young people. This series demonstrates to teenage viewers that individuals can make a difference and there are ways they, too, can get involved in their own communities."

MultiCultural Review