Bullfrog Films
80 minutes
Study Guide
Grades 6-12

Directed by Adrian Cowell
Produced by World Wide Fund for Nature - UK

DVD Purchase $185, Rent $75
VHS Purchase $185, Rent $75

US Release Date: 1991
Copyright Date: 1991
VHS ISBN: 1-59458-454-0

Subjects
Brazil
Children's Films
Climate Change/Global Warming
Developing World
Environment
Forests and Rainforests
Geography
History
Human Rights
Indigenous Peoples
International Studies
Latin American Studies
Politics
Social Justice

Awards and Festivals
Best Instructional Film, North American Association for Environmental Education Film Festival
A Series of 6 Programs
The Decade of Destruction - Classroom Version

The story of the destruction of the Amazonian rainforest.

"The tragedy is examined globally...in an unambiguous and intelligent matter." Children's Video Review Newsletter

With support from the World Wide Fund for Nature, Adrian Cowell has created a series of six programs for use in classrooms, based on his epic saga of the destruction of the Amazonian rainforest during the 1980's. The series gives students a well-rounded view of the many complex factors that led to what may be this century's worst environmental disaster.

The titles in the series are:

The Rainforest - The mechanics of a rainforest.

The Colonists - Colonists invading the rainforest.

The Development Road - The road to rainforest destruction.

The Indians - The displaced Indian tribes of the Amazon rainforest.

The Rubber Tappers - Rubber tappers live sustainable lifestyle.

The Politicians - Politicians plunder the Amazon rainforest.

All six programs are also available on one tape.

Web Page: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/dodcs.html

Reviews
"The tragedy is examined globally...in an unambiguous and intelligent matter."

Children's Video Review Newsletter

"Despite differences in language and climate, Cowell has given us a family album. Here is our own North American history, the taming of the West, the destruction of native peoples, the heroism and hardship of settlers and the gambling of a whole wild land on the chance of supporting a population that the cities could not absorb."
The Boston Globe