Bullfrog Films
52 minutes
Closed Captioned

Grades 10-12, College, Adult

Directed by Werner Volkmer
Produced by Catherine Mullins & Marrin Canell

DVD Purchase $250, Rent $75
VHS Purchase $250, Rent $75

US Release Date: 1995
Copyright Date: 1994
DVD ISBN: 0-7722-1219-8
VHS ISBN: 0-7722-0569-8

Subjects


Awards and Festivals
International Film Festival, Pretoria
The Human Race Series
The Bomb Under the World

What are the consequences of consumerism taking hold in developing countries like India?

"Insightful and well-argued." Online Journal of Peace & Conflict Resolution

Following deregulation of the economy, consumerism has hit India, and India's growing population is looking westward, demanding the same goods and a similar living standard.

And why shouldn't they? But what are the broader consequences of Western-style consumerism taking hold in large developing countries?

Other titles in the series are:

The Gods of Our Fathers - There is nothing innate in patriarchy and militarism. We can change our culture.

The Tribal Mind - Post-apartheid South Africa is the best example of people struggling to overcome tribalism.

Escaping From History - Poverty and the consumer ethic clash in Mexico City. What can we do?

Web Page: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/bomb.html

Reviews
"THE BOMB UNDER THE WORLD is primarily concerned with the societal and environmental impact of consumer culture in the underdeveloped world. It provides an insightful and well-argued case that if we are to survive this transformation, it must be understood and handled with intelligence and care."

Online Journal of Peace and Conflict Resolution

"An outstanding effort, sure to inspire both serious thinking and fruitful debate. Highly recommended."
EDITOR'S CHOICE, Video Librarian, March/April 1996

"Striking and well edited."
Booklist

"This is a fascinating series...deeply concerning by definition, but unable by circumstance to offer the quick-fix solution we all want."
The West Australian

"While many may see programs about overpopulation and other unpleasantries as depressing and futile, this series provides a glimmer of hope."
Niagara Falls Review