Bullfrog Films
59 minutes
Study Guide
Grades 9-12, College, Adult

Directed by Christopher McLeod
Produced by Christopher McLeod, Glenn Switkes & Randy Hayes

DVD Purchase $59, Rent $35
VHS Purchase $59, Rent $35

US Release Date: 1984
Copyright Date: 1983
DVD ISBN: 1-59458-631-4
VHS ISBN: 1-56029-218-0

Subjects
American Studies
Climate Change/Global Warming
Energy
Environment
Environmental Ethics
Indigenous Peoples
Native Americans
Nuclear Energy
Social Psychology
Toxic Chemicals
Western US

Awards and Festivals
Academy Award®, Best Student Documentary
Best of Category, National Association for Environmental Education Film Festival
Silver Medal, Houston International Film Festival
Best Documentary, Native American Film Festival
Editor's Choice, Science Books & Films
The Four Corners
A National Sacrifice Area?

The "hidden" cost of energy development in the homeland of the Hopi, Navajo, and Mormons.

"Superb for ecology, biology, history, energy/environmental studies, and social studies. A 'must-see'." Media & Methods

This renowned student Academy Award-winning documentary examines the social, cultural, and environmental impact of energy development in the Southwest U.S. The film takes its title from a National Academy of Sciences report which concluded that strip-mining in the fragile arid environment could permanently damage the land, resulting in "national sacrifice areas."

The film explores the hidden cost of uranium mining and milling, coal strip-mining, and synthetic fuels development in the "Golden Circle of National Parks" -- the homeland of Hopi, Navajo, and Mormon cultures.

Web Page: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/4c.html

Reviews
"Superb for ecology, biology, history, energy/environmental studies, and social studies. A 'must-see'."

Media and Methods

"A beautiful, impressive and thoroughly honest film. I hope millions of people see it."
Edward Abbey, author of Desert Solitaire

"A first-rate documentary."
Judy Stone, San Francisco Chronicle

"Hits moments of intensity which would be a credit to '60 Minutes'."
Michael Maza, The Phoenix Republic